Is Coke Zero Keto Friendly in 2021?

When it comes to soft drinks, even people adopting ketogenic diets; high-fat, adequate-protein, and low-carbohydrate dietary plans cannot resist the craving.

To quench this thirst, The Coca-Cola Company introduced Coke Zero recreating the original taste of Coke with “Zero Carbs” and “Zero Calories”.

But what’s really in them and are they Keto-Friendly? Let’s crack open a cold drink and explore Coke Zero. 

Is Coke Zero Keto Friendly

Ingredients and Nutrients

Coke Zero is mostly carbonated water in combination with a few ingredients that replicate the taste of the original Coke. The sweet taste in this drink is offered by artificial sweeteners, Aspartame and Acesulfame potassium (Ace-K) both of which are found to contain zero calories and zero carbs.

Sodium and Potassium are nutritious and essential minerals that play a vital role in the proper functioning of your heart and Coke Zero is loaded with them. 1 Can of Coke Zero contains as much as 60 mg potassium, 40 mg of sodium, and 34 mg of Caffeine but absolutely zero fat, zero carbs, and zero protein. It is also accompanied by phosphoric acid, potassium benzoate, potassium citrate, caramel color, and natural flavors. 

Sugar Level

As it’s clearly stated in the can and on its name; there is No Sugar in Coke Zero. The sugary taste of this drink is provided by the artificial sweeteners: Aspartame and Acesulfame potassium. The US FDA and other concerned authorities across the globe have confirmed that these sweeteners are safe for its use in foods and beverages. 

Bottom Line: Is Coke Zero Keto Friendly?

The answer: a big Yes! Coke Zero is one of the most popular keto-friendly drinks available to keto-lovers. However, since this drink contains caffeine, if you’re allergic to it then avoid drinking too much of it. But for the majority of people, Coke Zero offers you the taste of soda without interfering with your ketosis. So drink away!

Published By
Jenny Baker, RD, LD

Jenny Baker is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist based in New Jersey. She earned her degree in Nutrition from Stony Brook University of Medicine and has been practicing clinical nutrition for 5 years now.

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